Stories of 2019 #59: The Best Place for Breakfast in Seville – Filo

Three out of the four days we were in Seville, we ate at Filo. And everyday we both ordered the same thing. It turns out we are not the only ones either mad for this cafe, on TripAdvisor several people had visited on multiply occasions during their short stays. If this does not tell you how good this little cafe is, then I do not know what will!

Both me and Jessamyn, as avocado lovers, have both had our fair share of avocado on toast but then we came across this gem who made it like no other and the future of avocado on toast for us had changed. I just feel like no other cafe/restaurant can now compare. It sounds like I am going a bit OTT here with my statements but I would happily visit Seville again, alone, for this avocado on toast. And if you are not an avo toast fan (aka, my mum) – you are missing out.

Where did I come across this cafe?

Instagram. Like everything I place I find to eat or drink, I have found it on Instagram using hashtags or the location tool. It is actually a pretty useful tool for finding nice cafes and especially vegan/veggie eateries or, you know, a good bar…

As I am into eating healthily, when I saw delicious bowls of greens, granola and bright coloured smoothies, I was sold. Filo became a must visit place in Seville for me. Digging a little deeper, I also found out that it had two cafes and one was literally just around the corner from our hostel and we visited this cafe on our first full day in Seville before getting the train to Cadíz, and then everyday since that first visit (lol).

This quaint cafe is on Calle Hernando Colón down the road from Seville’s town hall. Inside is an intimate eating space with lots of wooden benches and stools. White walls provide the background for the rustic furniture, hanging plants and quirky features. However, due to the cafes small size it can get busy pretty quickly but there are two tables outside and a standing area.



From sandwiches, to salads, to sweet treats, Filo provides Seville with tasty and healthy food from breakfast to dinner. And whilst the decor is simple, the food and drinks are vibrant and freshly made right in front of us! One thing we loved as we now know how to make these slices of avocado bliss.

You order from the till so grab a seat and a flick through the menu. Choose between the various breakfast combinations or if is later in the day, choose between the sandwiches or build your own salad. But be ready to be tempted by all the cakes on display as you wait in line to order. Or if you were fans like us, head straight to the bar and order two energy combinations which includes, dark rye toast, tomato, avocado and seeds alongside freshly squeezed orange juice and an expresso. All for €6.50!

Take a seat, relax and watch the cooks at work whilst you wait for your name to be called. I think on our third return, all we spoke about was how excited we were to eat our breakfast!

The service is quick and it is not long until you are ready to eat and enter a dream like avocado toast state. Even the freshly squeezed orange juice is yum. In Seville their chosen breakfast dish is called ‘tostada’ which is toasted bread topped with olive oil and grated tomato or for the meat eaters ham is added. However, Filo took the tostado up a notch with their choice to use dark rye and add avocado and lots of seeds. We tried a tostado at another cafe but without the avocado and it just did not compare to Filo.

So, if you are ever in Seville and you are amongst the avocado toast tribe be sure to visit Filo for breakfast, lunch and dinner… because you can honestly can!

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Stories of 2019 #56: The Streets of Seville

Winding narrow streets lined with flower covered balconies and yellow painted walls, tapas bars packed with people sipping carveza and eating small plates of fried fish, and a grand gothic cathedral which looms over the city – Seville is bound to seduce you with its authentic charm and passionate spirit.

As the capital of Andalusia, set on the plain of the river Guadalquivir, Seville is the fourth largest city in Spain, as well as one of the hottest metropolitan areas in Southern western Europe. A fact me and Jessamyn liked!

People asked, why Seville? Well, neither of us had the answer to this either, which I think is why we both loved the city so much. We had no expectations, no understanding of what was there or what it would be like. We simply booked one night and a few weeks later, we were off. That is the beauty of unplanned travel – you never know what is around the corner.

We arrived late morning after the extremely early start of 2:30am to go to the airport (thank you Jessamyn’s mum and dad). Once we had landed and made our way through passport security, we caught the airport shuttle into the city centre (€4, single fare). Opting for a cheaper and more social scene, we had booked into a hostel called The Black Swan in Seville’s historic centre. Excellent hostel actually and I would highly recommend to anyone off to Seville. It was clean, friendly, great location next to Plaza Nueva and had all facilities you would need (even a hairdryer! Which annoyingly I had packed also). We were not allowed to check into our dorms until 2pm so we left our bags there and got lost in the maze of the city.

Turning right out of our hostel, we found ourselves by the river and crossing the bridge over to the area of Triana. Lined with cobbled streets, bustling coffee bars and ceramic tiles, the area of Triana is said to be more real in comparison to the city. We stumbled across the Real Parroquia de Senõra Santa Ana, a historic 13th-century catholic church. Many people were coming and going from the church with handfuls of flowers and all in their Sunday best. Giving it no thought, we seated ourselves outside of the church entrance at a bar called Santa Ana, where we had our first sips of Spanish espressos. Whilst Jessamyn was ordering our coffees, a swarm of people turned round the corner holding huge silver crosses, incense, flowers and dressed in white gowns. My table and I were swallowed up by the crowd and by the time Jessamyn returned, it had been spit back out! I could not believe what I was witnessing. This was our first (and least extravagant) sighting of the iconic Holy festival in Seville and one we would then continue to be followed by.

Perfumed by incense and buzzed by strong coffee, we walked further down the river or otherwise known as the Calle Betis towards the Parque de Maria Luisa and the Plaza de España. We wandered down the avenues which were shaded by hundreds of exotic trees and orange groves, as horse and carriages rode past with excited tourists sitting inside. The gardens are beautiful and with the sun shining, the park felt even more magical as we smelt roses, admired the mosaic tiled benches and watched the birds bathe themselves in that ponds.

Half a mile long, the parks centre is the hugely magnificent, Plaza de España. Known by the locals as the ‘Venice of Seville’ as the opulent semi-circle building has a 500-metre canal perched in-front, where you can rent small row boats and admire the granduer of the building and its four bridges from the rose lined canal. Brightly coloured ceramics feature heavily in the square, from the lamp posts to the floors, with pops of yellow and blue. And, if that was enough to squeeze into this lavish square, they also have 22 brightly coloured, uniquely designed benches that represent the 22 provinces in Spain. So, not only does the plaza encapsulate the spirit and beauty of Seville but also the entirety of Spain. (Also, we were so lucky with the weather. How beautifully blue is the sky)

Be sure to also keep your eyes peeled and ears out for the floor stomp of a flamenco dancer here in the square.

With our bellies rumbling after not eating since Stanstead’s finest restaurant, Weatherspoons, several hours ago, our taste buds were itching for their first taste of a true Spanish tapas. Unsure where to go as veggies in a city of fish and meat, we took to the Happy Cow app (something we came to rely on) and sourced a great Lebanese/Spanish tapas called El Rincon de Beirut along Calle San Fernando. We had hummus, tabbouleh, pitta, and falafel. It was also a great people watching spot! Especially with their Semana Santa festival unraveling around the city, so many people were gathering to see the processions.

On the way back to the hostel to finally freshen up, we caught our first procession of the hooded brotherhoods and marching bands! An amazing but eerie spectacle to witness. It was incredible to see such huge city come together and we both said we could not imagine anything like this happening at home. Honestly, thousands of people descending to the streets of Seville until the early hours of the morning. We also noted how many people in Spain could play an instrument?! I only know Hot Cross Buns on the recorder and even that is a push. Still confused (me too)… I will do a whole blog post on Holy Week, don’t you worry.

Through the maze of Seville’s streets, we arrived back to the hostel, showered and changed into our more weather-appropriate clothing. But the night is young and our next stop is the Royal Alcázar of Seville…